Archives for April 2015

Driving School Colchester Tips: Driving on Country Roads

Statistics could show that country roads can be the most dangerous to drive on. It’s around 66 percent of all people killed on Britain’s roads, lost their lives on rural roads. The motorways in the United Kingdom (UK) can be more frightening due to the presence of numerous speeding vehicles, however records could show they’re far safer than its quiet countryside roads. Here are great tips from the best Driving School Colchester.

Mostly, rural roads have a speed limit of 60 miles per hour (mph), however, this doesn’t mean you should often drive at this speed. So, you must drive your car at a speed which is appropriate for the condition of the road that you are facing. Many country roads are twisting, narrow, or have a poor surface.

Many dangerous and inexperienced drivers would take corners very fast, especially on country roads where bends are severe and can be hard to judge, so their possibility of meeting an accident is higher. So, you must reduce your speed when you approach a blind bend on a rural road. Remember the bend may hide any other potential hazards such as a horse and rider or a slow-moving vehicle.

Remember that blind bends are common on rural roads. They could hide oncoming vehicles, pedestrians, horses and other potential hazards. On urban roads you will often see the road marking “slow” to warn you of a blind bend ahead, but on rural roads, such markings are rarely to be found. So, you need to be extra cautious and treat every blind bend as potential hazard itself.

Remember the golden rule of speed: “Always drive your car at a speed that you can stop comfortably in the distance ahead that you’ll be safe.” So, when visibility is limited by hedges and bends you can use your horn to warn other road users of your presence. At night you can flash your headlights to give the same warning.

If you come round a blind bend and suddenly find your path blocked by another vehicle directly ahead of you, one of you will have to reverse to the nearest passing place. However, there are no exact rules on this situation but common sense is all it takes to apply.

When approaching horses and other animals you should reduce your speed and allow them plenty of space as you pass. Don’t sound your horn, don’t rev your engine, or do anything which may frighten them. If you come across a flock of sheep or herd of cattle blocking your way, you must stop, switch off your engine and wait until they’ve left the road.

When there are slow moving farm vehicles, the first rule, you have to follow to be considerate and don’t feel  being pressured to overtake even if a queue is building-up behind you. Only overtake when it’s really safe and legal to do so. You may find that drivers behind you will try and overtake you, so keep your eyes on your mirrors and often check them before you pull out to safely overtake the other vehicle on the road.

If there’s mud on the road, it’s a sign that a farm vehicle is just close from your location. So, be aware that such a vehicle may emerge from a concealed field entrance.

The Ministry of Driving

34 Manor Road

Colchester CO7 9LL

United Kingdom (UK)

Phone: 07557 745904
Email: info@tmod.co.uk

Monday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Tuesday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Wednesday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Friday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Saturday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Sunday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Driving Lessons Colchester Tips: Driving Over a Level Crossing

Driving over a level crossing has been dangerous especially to the learner drivers who are still inexperienced what this place is all about. This article intends to provide you with the essential information and tips how and when to drive safely over this area. Here are the useful Driving Lessons Colchester tips;

First, you have to know what a level crossing is all about. It is where a railroad crosses a road intended for vehicular traffic. Trains are passing over the level crossing at high speed. This means that when road fatalities occur at this area, the accidents are more often serious.

Most level crossings are utilising a sound alarm for pedestrians, traffic lights for the vehicles with light that goes steady and is amber in colour and the two flashing red stoplights.

So, you must always approach a level crossing with extra caution. You should never rush and take risks. Don’t ever think that you can jump the barriers easily and make it safely to the other side of the railway. You should only drive to a level crossing if and when the exit on the other side is already clear.

These are the things that you must avoid doing at any level crossing:

(1.)  Drive “nose to tail” over the level crossing.

(2.)  Stop on or just after the level crossing.

(3.)  Park close to the level crossing.

(4.)  Start crossing even if the alarm, lights or barriers operate to nearly close the exit.

(5.)  Zigzag around the half-barrier crossing.

The following are the different types of level crossings:

(1.)  Full-Barrier Level Crossing

(2.)  Half-Barrier Level Crossing

(3.)  User-Operated Level Crossing

(4.)  Open Level Crossing

(1.) The Full-Barrier Level Crossing has two barriers located on each side of the crossing extending over both lanes.

(2.) The Half-Barrier Level Crossing has barrier on each side of the crossing that extends over only one lane. And some of them will have no barrier.

(3.) User-Operated Level Crossing has stop signs and small green and red lights. When the green light is on is the only time you must cross. When the red light is on, you must stop and then wait. When crossing, you need to exit from your car and then open the barriers or gates on both sides of the level crossing.

(4.) Open Level Crossings has no gates, barriers, lights or attendant. There’s a give-way sign however. Approach this crossing with extra caution. Then stop, listen and look on both ways and make sure that there’s no approaching train.

Before driving over any level crossing, check to make sure the green light is still on. Once over the crossing you should exit your car and close the gates or barriers if it’s user-operated.

The amber light will be on when a train is approaching the level crossing. Then the flashing of red stoplights follows. If the amber light is on after you’ve passed the stop line, then you must continue to go forward. But you should stop and wait for the stop light to go off and the barriers to rise if you haven’t past the stop line yet.

Turn your engine off since you’ll be waiting for a few minutes. If a train has already passed by but the alarm is sounding a different tone and the stop lights continue to flash, then another train is approaching, so you must continue to wait.

The Ministry of Driving

34 Manor Road

Colchester CO7 9LL

United Kingdom (UK)

Phone: 07557 745904
Email: info@tmod.co.uk

Monday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Tuesday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Wednesday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Friday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Saturday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Sunday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Stopping Distances and Speed Limits Theory Tests

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) of the United Kingdom (UK) has been providing learner drivers with theory tests using its official test questions. In addition, there are three mock theory tests to be conducted as an essential part of the entire tests which include:

(1.)   speed limits

(2.)   stopping distances

(3.)   road signs

The online mock driving theory test in the UK has the following sample questions including their answer choices which are usually four in number. If you have not taken seriously your driving lessons in your driving school, you’ll only have a slim chance of passing.

 

(1.)  When driving a car at 30 mph, what’s the braking distance?

(a.)  25 metres
(b.) 30 metres
(c.)  14 metres
(d.) 19 metres

(2.) When travelling at 60 mph in good dry conditions, how long will it take you to stop?

(a.) 70 metres
(b.) 73 metres
(c.) 60 metres
(d.) 65 metres

(3.) How will the wet surface of the road or rain affect your stopping distance?

(a.) Quadruple
(b.) Ten times greater
(c.) Double
(d.) Treble

(4.) On a dual carriageway, you’re towing a small caravan. You must not exceed a speed of

(a.) 50 mph
(b.) 60 mph
(c.) 30 mph
(d.) 40 mph

(5.) In good dry conditions, how long will it take to stop at 50 mph?

(a.) 68 metres
(b.) 70 metres
(c.) 53 metres
(d.) 62 metres

(6.) In good dry conditions, how long will it take you to stop at 70 mph?

(a.) 102 metres
(b.) 109 metres
(c.) 87 metres
(d.) 96 metres

(7.) In a built up area, what’s the speed limit?

(a.) 50 mph
(b.) 60 mph
(c.) 30 mph
(d.) 40 mph

(8.) On an unrestricted single carriageway, what’s the speed limit?

(a.) 60 mph
(b.) 70 mph
(c.) 40 mph
(d.) 50 mph

(9.) In good dry conditions, how long will it take you to stop at 20 mph?

(a.) 18 metres
(b.) 21 metres
(c.) 10 metres
(d.) 12 metres

(10.) In good dry conditions, how long will it take you to stop at 30 mph?

(a.) 32 metres
(b.) 37 metres
(c.) 18 metres
(d.) 23 metres

(11.) On an unrestricted dual carriageway, what’s the speed limit?

(a.) 70 mph
(b.) 80 mph
(c.) 50 mph
(d.) 60 mph

(12.) When towing a trailer or caravan, what’s the speed limit in a built up area?

(a.) 40 mph
(b.) 50 mph
(c.) 20 mph
(d.) 30 mph

(13.) Whilst towing a trailer or caravan on a motorway,  what’s the speed limit?

(a.) 60 mph
(b.) 70 mph
(c.) 40 mph
(d.) 50 mph

(14.) In good dry conditions, how long will it take you to stop at 40 mph?

(a.) 36 metres
(b.) 41 metres
(c.) 28 metres
(d.) 32 metres

(15.) How will ice or snow affect the stopping distance?

(a.) Make it five times greater
(b.) Make it 10 times greater
(c.) Double it
(d.) Treble it

(16.) Thinking distance makes up the stopping distances plus braking distance. So, what is your thinking distance for every 10 mph of speed?

(a.) four metres
(b.) five metres
(c.) two metres
(d.) three metres

(17.) Thinking and braking distance makes up the overall stopping distance. You’re on a road surface which is good and dry with good tyres and brakes. At 50 mph, what’s the typical braking distance?

(a.) 38 metres (125 feet)
(b.) 55 metres (180 feet)
(c.) 14 metres (46 feet)
(d.) 24 metres (80 feet)

(18.) The overall stopping distance would be much longer when you’re driving

(a.) at Night
(b) in strong winds
(c.) in the rain
(d.) in fog

(19.) The scooter or wheelchair, used by disabled person has a maximum speed of

(a.) 16 mph
(b.) 20 mph
(c.) eight mph
(d.) 12 mph

Enroll now at the best driving schools Colchester. Book Now!

The Ministry of Driving

34 Manor Road

Colchester CO7 9LL

United Kingdom (UK)

Phone: 07557 745904
Email: info@tmod.co.uk

Monday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Tuesday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Wednesday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Friday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Saturday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Sunday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM