Driving Lessons Colchester Tips: Driving Over a Level Crossing

Driving over a level crossing has been dangerous especially to the learner drivers who are still inexperienced what this place is all about. This article intends to provide you with the essential information and tips how and when to drive safely over this area. Here are the useful Driving Lessons Colchester tips;

First, you have to know what a level crossing is all about. It is where a railroad crosses a road intended for vehicular traffic. Trains are passing over the level crossing at high speed. This means that when road fatalities occur at this area, the accidents are more often serious.

Most level crossings are utilising a sound alarm for pedestrians, traffic lights for the vehicles with light that goes steady and is amber in colour and the two flashing red stoplights.

So, you must always approach a level crossing with extra caution. You should never rush and take risks. Don’t ever think that you can jump the barriers easily and make it safely to the other side of the railway. You should only drive to a level crossing if and when the exit on the other side is already clear.

These are the things that you must avoid doing at any level crossing:

(1.)  Drive “nose to tail” over the level crossing.

(2.)  Stop on or just after the level crossing.

(3.)  Park close to the level crossing.

(4.)  Start crossing even if the alarm, lights or barriers operate to nearly close the exit.

(5.)  Zigzag around the half-barrier crossing.

The following are the different types of level crossings:

(1.)  Full-Barrier Level Crossing

(2.)  Half-Barrier Level Crossing

(3.)  User-Operated Level Crossing

(4.)  Open Level Crossing

(1.) The Full-Barrier Level Crossing has two barriers located on each side of the crossing extending over both lanes.

(2.) The Half-Barrier Level Crossing has barrier on each side of the crossing that extends over only one lane. And some of them will have no barrier.

(3.) User-Operated Level Crossing has stop signs and small green and red lights. When the green light is on is the only time you must cross. When the red light is on, you must stop and then wait. When crossing, you need to exit from your car and then open the barriers or gates on both sides of the level crossing.

(4.) Open Level Crossings has no gates, barriers, lights or attendant. There’s a give-way sign however. Approach this crossing with extra caution. Then stop, listen and look on both ways and make sure that there’s no approaching train.

Before driving over any level crossing, check to make sure the green light is still on. Once over the crossing you should exit your car and close the gates or barriers if it’s user-operated.

The amber light will be on when a train is approaching the level crossing. Then the flashing of red stoplights follows. If the amber light is on after you’ve passed the stop line, then you must continue to go forward. But you should stop and wait for the stop light to go off and the barriers to rise if you haven’t past the stop line yet.

Turn your engine off since you’ll be waiting for a few minutes. If a train has already passed by but the alarm is sounding a different tone and the stop lights continue to flash, then another train is approaching, so you must continue to wait.

The Ministry of Driving

34 Manor Road

Colchester CO7 9LL

United Kingdom (UK)

Phone: 07557 745904
Email: info@tmod.co.uk

Monday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Tuesday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Wednesday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Friday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Saturday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Sunday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Stopping Distances and Speed Limits Theory Tests

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) of the United Kingdom (UK) has been providing learner drivers with theory tests using its official test questions. In addition, there are three mock theory tests to be conducted as an essential part of the entire tests which include:

(1.)   speed limits

(2.)   stopping distances

(3.)   road signs

The online mock driving theory test in the UK has the following sample questions including their answer choices which are usually four in number. If you have not taken seriously your driving lessons in your driving school, you’ll only have a slim chance of passing.

 

(1.)  When driving a car at 30 mph, what’s the braking distance?

(a.)  25 metres
(b.) 30 metres
(c.)  14 metres
(d.) 19 metres

(2.) When travelling at 60 mph in good dry conditions, how long will it take you to stop?

(a.) 70 metres
(b.) 73 metres
(c.) 60 metres
(d.) 65 metres

(3.) How will the wet surface of the road or rain affect your stopping distance?

(a.) Quadruple
(b.) Ten times greater
(c.) Double
(d.) Treble

(4.) On a dual carriageway, you’re towing a small caravan. You must not exceed a speed of

(a.) 50 mph
(b.) 60 mph
(c.) 30 mph
(d.) 40 mph

(5.) In good dry conditions, how long will it take to stop at 50 mph?

(a.) 68 metres
(b.) 70 metres
(c.) 53 metres
(d.) 62 metres

(6.) In good dry conditions, how long will it take you to stop at 70 mph?

(a.) 102 metres
(b.) 109 metres
(c.) 87 metres
(d.) 96 metres

(7.) In a built up area, what’s the speed limit?

(a.) 50 mph
(b.) 60 mph
(c.) 30 mph
(d.) 40 mph

(8.) On an unrestricted single carriageway, what’s the speed limit?

(a.) 60 mph
(b.) 70 mph
(c.) 40 mph
(d.) 50 mph

(9.) In good dry conditions, how long will it take you to stop at 20 mph?

(a.) 18 metres
(b.) 21 metres
(c.) 10 metres
(d.) 12 metres

(10.) In good dry conditions, how long will it take you to stop at 30 mph?

(a.) 32 metres
(b.) 37 metres
(c.) 18 metres
(d.) 23 metres

(11.) On an unrestricted dual carriageway, what’s the speed limit?

(a.) 70 mph
(b.) 80 mph
(c.) 50 mph
(d.) 60 mph

(12.) When towing a trailer or caravan, what’s the speed limit in a built up area?

(a.) 40 mph
(b.) 50 mph
(c.) 20 mph
(d.) 30 mph

(13.) Whilst towing a trailer or caravan on a motorway,  what’s the speed limit?

(a.) 60 mph
(b.) 70 mph
(c.) 40 mph
(d.) 50 mph

(14.) In good dry conditions, how long will it take you to stop at 40 mph?

(a.) 36 metres
(b.) 41 metres
(c.) 28 metres
(d.) 32 metres

(15.) How will ice or snow affect the stopping distance?

(a.) Make it five times greater
(b.) Make it 10 times greater
(c.) Double it
(d.) Treble it

(16.) Thinking distance makes up the stopping distances plus braking distance. So, what is your thinking distance for every 10 mph of speed?

(a.) four metres
(b.) five metres
(c.) two metres
(d.) three metres

(17.) Thinking and braking distance makes up the overall stopping distance. You’re on a road surface which is good and dry with good tyres and brakes. At 50 mph, what’s the typical braking distance?

(a.) 38 metres (125 feet)
(b.) 55 metres (180 feet)
(c.) 14 metres (46 feet)
(d.) 24 metres (80 feet)

(18.) The overall stopping distance would be much longer when you’re driving

(a.) at Night
(b) in strong winds
(c.) in the rain
(d.) in fog

(19.) The scooter or wheelchair, used by disabled person has a maximum speed of

(a.) 16 mph
(b.) 20 mph
(c.) eight mph
(d.) 12 mph

Enroll now at the best driving schools Colchester. Book Now!

The Ministry of Driving

34 Manor Road

Colchester CO7 9LL

United Kingdom (UK)

Phone: 07557 745904
Email: info@tmod.co.uk

Monday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Tuesday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Wednesday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Friday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Saturday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Sunday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Driving School Colchester: Learning Britain’s Windscreen Rules

In terms of windscreen rules, the government of the United Kingdom (UK) through its Department for Transport issued a statement providing general guidance and best advice for motorists about the legislative requirements on windscreen as well as the fastening of stickers on it that could obscure the view of the driver behind the steering wheel.

The government statement further emphasised that every effort has been undertaken to make sure that it’s factually correct placement of stickers, however, the recipients should also check if they’re unsure about the validity of a particular rule right after the date of publication until the present if they have reason to believe any part of it is already out of date, incorrect or inaccurate.

The act of placing stickers in the car’s windscreen is not illegal, however, it’s still to be called an offence as specified under regulation number 30 of the road vehicles if you’re driving a car in which the glass is maintained in such a condition that the driver’s vision is impaired.

It’s also a requirement when taking the windscreen test of the Ministry of Transport (MOT) that any windscreen that’s being obscured or damaged to the extent where the driver’s vision is impaired may fail the windscreen test.

In order to better define what may be permissible, the windscreen is divided into Zones:

(1.)  The Zone A  – it is a vertical area 29 mm wide, centred on the steering wheel and contained  within the swept area of the windscreen which is 350 mm wide on vehicles over 3.5 tonnes.

(2.) The Zone B – it is the remainder of the swept area of the windscreen.

For simplicity, the discolouration, cracks or surface damage, are simply referred to as damage. In Zone A, a single damaged area shall be contained within a 10 mm diametre circle. A combination of minor damage areas shall not seriously restrict the drivers view. Windscreen stickers, or other obstructions shouldn’t go beyond more than 10 mm.

In Zone B, a single damaged area shall be contained within a 40mm diametre circle. Windscreen stickers or other obstructions, shall not encroach more than 40 mm.

On the rear view windscreen, nothing is specifically illegal about obscuring the driver’s view through the rear window of a car. But if the rear window is obscured, for example by an oversised sticker or load, the driver may be liable to prosecution.

If the vehicle does not meet the requirements of regulation 33 of the road vehicles regulations of 1986, which states that when a view to the rear is not possible through the interior rear-view mirror, two fully functional exterior mirrors must be fitted to the vehicle.

You should also be aware that regulation 100 of the road vehicles regulations of 1986 requires the following:

(1.) A motor vehicle, and all its parts and accessories.

(2.) The number of passengers being carried including the manner in which they’re carried on or in a vehicle.

(3.) The distribution, weight, adjustment and packing of the vehicle’s load are to be at all times so that no danger is caused or is likely to be caused to any person in or on a vehicle or on a road.

Get your driving skills from the best Driving School Colchester!

The Ministry of Driving

34 Manor Road

Colchester CO7 9LL

United Kingdom (UK)

Phone: 07557 745904
Email: info@tmod.co.uk